Contractor John's DIY House Medic

No Contract Equals A Horror Story

September 14, 2020 Contractor John Season 1 Episode 20
Contractor John's DIY House Medic
No Contract Equals A Horror Story
Chapters
Contractor John's DIY House Medic
No Contract Equals A Horror Story
Sep 14, 2020 Season 1 Episode 20
Contractor John

                                                 Podcast Show Notes

 

Season:  1

Episode:  20

 Episode Title:  No Contract Equals Horror Story!

  Episode Summary:

Contractor John shares with you a real-world horror story, from a job when I didn’t “Honor The Process”. Every job needs a written contract and then needs you to adhere to it. Listen to hear the horror story that developed in my world when I did not practice what I preach.

Contract Points (not all -inclusive, please consult an attorney before signing any contract)

·       Obviously on very small jobs, a contract might be a 3 or 4 line description of the job. On other larger jobs it can be pages long In either case it has to contain

1    the description of the work to be performed., with product specification, including manufacturers and model number information.

2   In addition there should be a section defining the owner’s responsibilities 

3   the course of action to be taken in case of a disagreement if the parties cannot work it out among themselves. 

4   Also the amount of time the job will take

5   If it is a longer duration job ask the number of workers that will be on the job daily

6   Also make sure you get a COI, certificate of Insurance from the contractor, including liability, and workers comp coverage

7   Are all the workers who will be doing work employees or are some of them subcontractors? If so, make sure to get COI’s from them also, or as I have said before in previous episodes you could be held liable if someone was to get hurt on the job.

8   Also, a section outlining the contractor’s warranty, what it covers and for how long.  Coming up in the not too distant future I will be doing an episode “All About Warranties”

9  Lastly the payment schedule should be outlined including allowable hold back amounts in the case of a disagreement.

a. Let me throw this is about payments…. You can use a title company to do the payouts. Connect with them for their fee schedule, really, I have found them to be reasonable for what they do. From the contractor’s point of view if all the money is deposited with the title company before the job begins, they know the client has all the money needed to finish the job and ….

b.  From the client’s perspective they know all the paperwork will be completed correctly, the money will be paid out with their authorization and relevant to the amount of work performed

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Roy Worley Voice Overs

 

Ask questions, post comments at the Contractor John/DIY House Medic Facebook Page 

 

Visit the Contractor John website and receive a free monthly Home Maintenance Checklist for following

Contractor John

 

Visit the Contractor John YouTube Channel and please Subscribe to my channel.

Show Notes

                                                 Podcast Show Notes

 

Season:  1

Episode:  20

 Episode Title:  No Contract Equals Horror Story!

  Episode Summary:

Contractor John shares with you a real-world horror story, from a job when I didn’t “Honor The Process”. Every job needs a written contract and then needs you to adhere to it. Listen to hear the horror story that developed in my world when I did not practice what I preach.

Contract Points (not all -inclusive, please consult an attorney before signing any contract)

·       Obviously on very small jobs, a contract might be a 3 or 4 line description of the job. On other larger jobs it can be pages long In either case it has to contain

1    the description of the work to be performed., with product specification, including manufacturers and model number information.

2   In addition there should be a section defining the owner’s responsibilities 

3   the course of action to be taken in case of a disagreement if the parties cannot work it out among themselves. 

4   Also the amount of time the job will take

5   If it is a longer duration job ask the number of workers that will be on the job daily

6   Also make sure you get a COI, certificate of Insurance from the contractor, including liability, and workers comp coverage

7   Are all the workers who will be doing work employees or are some of them subcontractors? If so, make sure to get COI’s from them also, or as I have said before in previous episodes you could be held liable if someone was to get hurt on the job.

8   Also, a section outlining the contractor’s warranty, what it covers and for how long.  Coming up in the not too distant future I will be doing an episode “All About Warranties”

9  Lastly the payment schedule should be outlined including allowable hold back amounts in the case of a disagreement.

a. Let me throw this is about payments…. You can use a title company to do the payouts. Connect with them for their fee schedule, really, I have found them to be reasonable for what they do. From the contractor’s point of view if all the money is deposited with the title company before the job begins, they know the client has all the money needed to finish the job and ….

b.  From the client’s perspective they know all the paperwork will be completed correctly, the money will be paid out with their authorization and relevant to the amount of work performed

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Roy Worley Voice Overs

 

Ask questions, post comments at the Contractor John/DIY House Medic Facebook Page 

 

Visit the Contractor John website and receive a free monthly Home Maintenance Checklist for following

Contractor John

 

Visit the Contractor John YouTube Channel and please Subscribe to my channel.